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Dawn Kalis

Adjunct Lecturer in Music (Harpsichord)

Contact Information:

dkalis@indiana.edu

Merrill Hall MU353

Department

Early Music

Education
  • D.M., Doctor of Music, Indiana University
  • M.M., Master of Music, University of Michigan
  • B.M., Bachelor of Music, University of Michigan
Biography

Dawn Kalis is adjunct lecturer in harpsichord at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music.

She earned a Doctor of Music degree from the Jacobs School’s Historical Performance Institute and Master of Music and Bachelor of Music degrees from the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance.

Kalis is artistic director of the baroque ensemble Les Muses du Dauphin. The group’s 2015-16 activities include a concert of early Italian music in tandem with the Annibale Carraci exhibit at the Indiana University Art Museum and presenting the music series “From the Old World to the New” at IU’s Wylie House Museum. The series includes music from the French Baroque and the American Revolution. She will be joining the Bach Collegium of Ft. Wayne, Ind., during its Baroque Festival in February. Performances there include two harpsichord works as well as the oratorio Die Israeliten in der Wüste by C. P. E. Bach.

Kalis has received numerous awards, including the Frank Huntington Beebe Fund for study in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and the Harriet Hale Woolley Scholarship for study in Paris, France. She gives master classes, recitals, and lecture-recitals at universities and colleges throughout the United States as well as harpsichord demonstrations for the National Guild of Organists and various piano guilds.

Her doctoral document, “Early French Keyboard Music: A Historic Journey,” is a resource that provides an anthology of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century French harpsichord music presented in tandem with cultural, musical, and historical information. Its presentation is enhanced with over 250 musical examples and visual images, introducing students of early keyboard literature to the world of the French Baroque.