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Menahem Pressler honored by the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 18, 2007

Pressler, Menahem
Menahem Pressler
Print-Quality Photo

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Indiana University Jacobs School of Music Distinguished Professor Menahem Pressler will be appointed as an Honorary Fellow of the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance. The title "Honorary Fellow" is bestowed by the academy upon artists whose exceptional contribution to the fields of music and dance has influenced artistic expression in Israel and throughout the world.

Beginning this June, on the occasion of the academy's celebrations of its 75th anniversary, the world-renowned pianist will accept the honor. Other world leaders in music who have received the honor include conductor Daniel Barenboim, violinist Isaac Stern and cellist Mstislav Rostropovich.

Since joining the faculty of the IU Jacobs School of Music in 1955, Pressler has won acclaim on the stage and in his studio. He co-founded and is a continuing member of the Beaux Arts Trio, one of the world's most widely acclaimed chamber music ensembles, which recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. As a soloist, Pressler has performed with some of the world's top ensembles, including the orchestras of New York, Chicago, London, Paris, Brussels and Oslo. In addition to more than 50 recordings with the Beaux Arts Trio, he has compiled more than 30 solo recordings, ranging from the works of Bach to Ben Haim.

Pressler's many accolades include the German President's Deutsche Bundesverdienstkreuz (Cross of Merit) First Class, Germany's highest honor; and Commandeur in the Order of Arts and Letters, France's highest cultural honor. Pressler has received the Gold Medal of Merit from the National Society of Arts and Letters, four Grammy nominations, Ensemble of the Year from Musical America, a Lifetime Achievement Award from Gramophone magazine in London, and the German Critics Ehrenurkunde award in recognition of 40 years of being the standard by which chamber music is measured.