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‘Glory Without Love?’ Lully opera selections performed in Baroque style

What: "Lully: Glory Without Love?"-- operatic selections
When: Saturday, April 21, and Sunday, April 22, at 4 p.m.
Where: Auer Hall
Tickets: Free, no tickets required.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 18, 2012

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- The delights of Jean-Baptiste Lully's magical dances, airs, recitatives and triumphant marches will be on display in Auer Hall this weekend as the Early Music Institute, Jacobs School Ballet Department and Pro Arte Singers combine forces to present "Lully: Glory Without Love?"

Lully Opera Rehearsal
A rehearsal for "Lully: Glory Without Love?"
Print-Quality Photo

With an original script by guest actor Mace Perlman, baroque choreography by guest stage director Catherine Turocy and music direction by Nigel North, the program weaves together scenes chosen from the most poignant moments in the composer's operas and comedy-ballets Psyché, Alceste, Armide, Atys, Isis, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme and Bellérophon.

For this production, the Early Music Institute has brought together two outside professionals to work with students on artistic expression specific to the French seventeenth century.

Choreographer and period movement expert Turocy, director of the New York Baroque Dance Company, has worked with ballet students and singers in the art of early French dance, gesture and pantomime. She has also provided a number of elaborate period costumes, which will be used by dancers during this production.

By weaving Lully's music into one moving story about the impossible tension between love and glory, Perlman has created a staging for the production, with inspiration from the diverse masks of the commedia dell'arte. His collection of Venetian commedia masks will also be featured.

Lully, love and power are three key words that combine to create "Lully: Glory Without Love?" From the allegory of Glory herself to such diverse characters as Armida, Renaud, Fury and Italian and Spanish lovers; from suicidal scenes, dream scenes, triumphant marches and the wonders of Lully's passacaille, this production will present what Perlman has called the "many eyes of Lully's life and art."

With talented student soloists, a full baroque orchestra, the choral strengths of the Pro Arte Singers, the masterful baroque choreography of Turocy and the commedia dell'arte-inspired staging of Perlman, audiences will be offered a unique and powerful experience that captures the essence of the French baroque.