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Beaux Arts Trio -- with IU Distinguished Professor Menahem Pressler -- inducted into American Classical Music Hall of Fame

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Oct. 23, 2012

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - The Beaux Arts Trio, including founding member Menahem Pressler, distinguished professor of piano at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, was inducted into the American Classical Music Hall of Fame in Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 10.

Pressler, Menahem
Menahem Pressler
Print-Quality Photo

Pressler was co-founder and only pianist of the Beaux Arts Trio for 53 years. The group, including violinist Daniel Hope and cellist Antonio Meneses, took its final bow in September 2008, marking the end of one of the most celebrated and revered chamber music careers of all time.

Pressler, now 88, continues to dazzle audiences throughout the world, both as piano soloist and collaborating chamber musician, and has been a faculty member at the Jacobs School of Music since 1955.

His most recent awards include the 2012 Yehudi Menuhin Prize for the Integration of Arts and Education from Queen Sofia of Spain, the 2012 Music Teachers National Association Achievement Award and the 2011 Wigmore Medal.

Other 2012 Hall of Fame inductees are composer Steve Reich, pianist Emanuel Ax, conductors Dale Warland and David Zinman, educator Nadia Boulanger, the Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera America.

The eight new inductees will have their names engraved in the Walk of Fame in Cincinnati's Washington Park in front of Music Hall, and they will be featured on the park's interactive Walk of Fame.

The Hall of Fame will work with the inductees to schedule events where medallions can be presented to them.

Founded in 1996 by Cincinnatian David Klingshirn, the American Classical Music Hall of Fame is a nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring and celebrating the many facets of American classical music. The Hall of Fame seeks to recognize those who have made significant contributions to American classical music and, by doing so, aspires to sustain and build interest in the field.